In our view

Play critical role - 24 October 2014 - Cape Times

By Nazli Abrahams, Programme Director, Inyathelo

play critical roleThe chief executive of Community Chest South Africa, Lorenzo Davids, had a serious swipe at the non-profit or charitable sector last week, accusing them of "muddled thinking" and a lack of transformation and willingness to change.

The chief executive of Community Chest South Africa, Lorenzo Davids, had a serious swipe at the non-profit or charitable sector last week, accusing them of "muddled thinking" and a lack of transformation and willingness to change.

He even went as far to say that NPOs are "selling misery, not solutions", and producing no tangible diference despite the R31billion spent on the sector last year (NGOs need new mindset to work, Cape Times, October 17).

But change doesn't happen in a vacuum and blaming non-profits for the lack of progress on poverty, crime, homelessness and unemployment is a little like shooting the messenger.

The system is broken, not the NPO sector.

Philanthropy in times of disaster: Beyond the emergency - 6 March 2014 - Daily Maverick

By Shelagh Gastrow, Executive Director, Inyathelo

shelagh dm 17mar2015

The incredible campaign run by radio stations KFM and CapeTalk to raise funds for the Volunteer Wildfire Service involved in beating back the devastating Cape Town and other Western Cape fires has proved to be an important indicator of how people pull together in times of crisis and disaster, not only volunteering time and effort, but also their financial resources.

As I listened to the radio, I heard children donating their pocket money, sports people and celebrities publicly pledging money, small businesses coming to the party, along with large corporations that challenged their clients and customers to contribute. Besides money, all kinds of resources were provided such as food, shelter, water, medical assistance, blankets and clothing.

Private funding will help to keep democracy alive. By Shelagh Gastrow - 17 October 2014 - Business Report

PHILANTHROPY AND LITIGATION

The key difference between private philanthropic funding and money coming from the government or the corporate sector is the issue of accountability. Mark Shuttleworth is putting money into defending constitutional rights in Africa. 

shelagh shulttsworth1

We are living in a fastchanging world with new technologies, new paradigms, rapid urbanisation, more instability and hugely complex issues to manage. This requires innovation, long-term thinking, the use of resources for greatest impact and systemic change. This also means we have to find ways to co-operate, collaborate and build alliances.

What we also know is that innovation does not come from the centre, but it emerges from the edge. New ideas are often first seen as unconventional and are contested by those who hold the reins of power. While mainstream now, the women's movement and the environmental movement both emerged from the edge.

African philanthropy is not about alms, but the fair distribution of resources - 09 Oct 2013 - Cape Times

bhekiThis opinion piece by Bhekinkosi Moyo was published in the Cape Times (second edition) on 09 October 2013

SOUTH Africa, and indeed Africa as a continent, is undergoing many structural transformations, partly inspired by demands for equity, equality and social cohesion. In this process, African philanthropy continues to play a central and very important role in the lives of Africans.

The primary function of philanthropy in any given society is to provide love for humanity If it fails in its primary role, then philanthropy becomes obsolete. In other words, philanthropy cannot exist harmoniously with inequality, poverty, social injustices, war and other destructive elements found across the world.

Where such injustices exist, philanthropy's role is to eliminate them. This is because I define philanthropy as encompassing notions of mutuality solidarity, reciprocity and synergetic relations. In most of Africa, philanthropy is a daily experience, and more importantly, African philanthropy is a response to various socioeconomic and political problems.

Philanthropy works: just one big idea makes a huge difference - 09 Oct 2013 - Cape Times

This opinion piece by Gillian Mitchell was published in the Cape Times (second edition) on 09 October 2013

WHAT is the right time to become a philanthropist? Is there an optimal age? Is it that moment when you think you have more money than you need? Does it depend on how much free time you have? Do you have to be religious? Do you need a social conscience? Should you have a plan?

On November 5, Inyathelo: The South African Institute for Advancement will again honour South African philanthropists who through their insight, hard work and contributions make the lives of others better. It is seven years since the first Inyathelo Philanthropy Awards were held and judging by the quality and quantity of nominations this year, there is no shortage of people doing good by giving.

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